Consortium Gives Alum Tools to Build Successful Solo Practice

MavEryck Langford Stevenson
MavEryck Langford Stevenson ’16

MavEryck Langford Stevenson ’16 graduated only a year ago. But it didn’t take long for him to make a name for himself: He was recently hailed as Solo Practitioner of the Month by Attorney At Law magazine.

Stevenson is one of the competitively selected members of the Los Angeles Incubator Consortium (LAIC), a collaboration between Loyola, legal aid organizations, the Los Angeles County Law Library and other Los Angeles law schools. The consortium provides recent graduates with mentoring, training and access to a variety of legal resources. Additionally, LAIC provides its attorneys with opportunities to build their network and referral base in order to kick-start a solo practice.

“LAIC helped me establish my practice,” Stevenson says. “Everyone involved with the program really puts forth the effort to help us in any way possible. I feel fortunate to be part of this group.”

These resources have already allowed him to make strides in building a successful practice representing clients in areas ranging from bankruptcy, criminal law, entertainment law and health care law.

“What I like most about my job is making a difference and improving the quality of people’s lives,” the Army veteran says.

Law was a career change for Stevenson, a graduate of Loyola’s Evening Program. A flexible class schedule allowed him to attend school while keeping his position as a federal agent in the U.S. Department of Labor, where he assisted disabled veterans in securing the benefits to which they were legally entitled. Despite a busy schedule, Stevenson was an active member the Black Law Students Association and several other student organizations.

“What I enjoyed most about campus life was interacting with other students,” says Stevenson, who made time to socialize with members of his cohort. “Students in the Evening Program brought a wealth of life experience to class with them.”

As a student, Stevenson enrolled in the Criminal Justice Concentration, which provides students a framework for classes, one-on-one mentoring and networking events with prosecutors, public defenders and private criminal defense attorneys. The program includes a capstone experiential requirement. Stevenson worked as a judicial assistant for the Los Angeles Superior Court.

Learn more about how the No. 1 part-time law program on the West Coast can help you make a difference. Register for a campus tour and read more about Loyola’s unique Evening Program